Yosemite

Sign PDFs with TrackPad

Ever had to sign documents quickly and return them to a sender? No matter the type of document that you're trying to sign, if you can avoid a printing, then sign, then scan, and send back workflow, it's always appreciated. Mac OS X's Preview application has long allowed for digital signatures, but in Yosemite you can sign documents using the trackpad, too.

Create a Signature with your TrackPad

  • Step 1: Open PDF that you wish to sign in the Preview App.
  • Step 2: Click View
  • Step 3: Click Show Markup Toolbar (Command + Shift + A)
  • Step 4: Chose the Sign button in the tool bar that appears, then click "Create Signature"
  • Step 5: In the Signature popup that appears, choose the Trackpad option , and click the "Click here to begin" button.

Once in this mode, sign you name using your finger on the trackpad.

When you are done with your signature, press any key on the keyboard to exit editing mode, and then press the Done button in the popup to save the signature in Preview.

You can also get a signature without the trackpad. To do so, follow the same steps as above, but choose the Camera option in step 5. Create a physical signature using black ink on a white piece of paper (for best results), then hold this signature up to the iSight camera on your Mac.

Use your Signature

When you are ready to use the signature in your document, follow these steps:

  • Step 1: Click View.
  • Step 2: Click Show Markup Toolbar (Command + Shift + A ).
  • Step 3: Choose the Sign button, then click on one of the saved signatures that appears in the list.

Once you do this, you'll see the signature inserted into the document. You can then resize and move the signature around on the PDF to make it look just right and fit over the signature area of the document you're signing.

Don't forget you need to save the signature inside of the document using Command + S (or get advanced save options by pressing Option + Command + Shift + S to open the Save As... panel).

Apple Notifies Aperture Users of Upcoming Removal From App Store

Apple sent an email to Aperture customers today to reminder them about the impending removal of the professional grade photo editing software from the Mac App Store. The email confirms that Aperture will be removed from the Mac App Store when the release of Photos for OS X. When Photos for OS X launches this spring, Aperture will no longer be available for purchase from the Mac App Store. You can continue to use Aperture on OS X Yosemite, but you will not be able to buy additional copies of the app.  You can migrate your Aperture library to Photos for OS X, including your photos, adjustments, albums, and keywords. After migrating, your Aperture library remains intact. However, Aperture and Photos do not share a unified library, so any changes made after the migration will not be shared between the apps.

Aperture users will be able to continue using the software on OS X Yosemite after its discontinued. Aperture users can migrate their photo libraries to Photos for OS X, including photos, adjustments, albums and keywords.

Photos for OS X will be available this spring for OS X Yosemite.

Must-Know Tips & Tricks for OS X Yosemite

If you have upgraded to Yosemite you've seen some changes visually but may not know the benefits of the update. If you haven't upgraded to Yosemite, we recommend backing your computer up before you upgrade. There are a ton of new features included in this update that make life a little sweeter and make your friends looking through windows jelly.  Here is just a pinch of what you can now do.

#1. Answer and make phone calls

If you have an iPhone (5 or later), you can now make and receive phone calls on your Mac computer. Simply make sure you're on the same Wi-Fi network and are using the same iCloud account on both devices.

When you're in the Messages app, go to Preferences -> Accounts and make sure your number is checked. Now, anytime you receive a phone call, you'll get a notification at the top right of your computer screen where you can choose to accept or decline it.

To make a call, go to FaceTime and either enter the number you want to call or hit the phone icon next to a recent number under the Audio tab.

Bonus: In addition to Yosemite, Wi-Fi calling via iPhone also works on the iPad Air, iPad mini, and iPad mini with Retina display.

#2. Receive & Send SMS Text Messages

While you've been able to send iMessages to other iOS users directly from your computer, regular text messages were still relegated to your iPhone. Now, thanks to SMS Relay, you can send text messages directly from the Messages app on your Mac.

Set up the iMessage app on your Mac with your iCloud credentials. Leave the app open on your Mac and, on your iOS device, navigate to Settings -> Messages -> Text Message Forwarding. Once you see your device listed, toggle it on. You may also be required to input a verification code, so make sure to leave iMessage open on your Mac to receive it.

#3. Name Your Group Messages When we’re talking with a group of friends, it’s usually about something specific, you can now label your conversations accordingly. Click the Details button inside a group message and you’ll see an option to give it a name. It’ll also sync the title with all of your other devices, so you won’t lose track of it.

#4. Stop blowing up my phone Sometimes you just don't want to be bothered by the onslaught of a back-and-forth group message. In Yosemite you won’t have to anymore. Inside the Details window are two ways to put a stop to the distractions: Turn on Do Not Disturb to stop getting notifications every time someone has a reply, or leave the conversation entirely. And like everything else, whatever you decide will be reflected on all of your devices.

#5. Smarter Spotlight Search Spotlight has been greatly enhanced in Yosemite, evolving from a simple system searcher to a full-fledged information center always at the ready. Just press Command-Space and the behemoth search field will automatically pop up in the middle of the screen. You can use it to hunt for long-lost files hidden in dark corners of your hard drive and it can find just about anything else you may be looking for: maps, trailers, definitions, songs, phone numbers... even pictures of The Fonz on his Triumph, if you're looking to be cool like him.

#6. New Tricks for Spotlight Spotlight can help you in a variety of new ways: Need currency conversion? Or maybe you need to know how many miles are in 24 kilometers or what 211 degrees Fahrenheit looks like in Celsius? How about movie times? Spotlight's got you covered.

211 degrees
211 degrees

#7. Find your Safari Favorites Apple has ditched the bookmark bar in Safari 8 for a cleaner browsing experience. Of course, you can still get to them with the dropdown menu or the sidebar, but Apple has given us a much easier method in Yosemite: just click inside the address bar and a "grid" of your favorites magically appear. If you want, you can still have the "old-fashioned" bar, bring it back in the View settings.

#8. See All of Your Open Tabs is Safari Tabs have always been a part of our multitasking workflow, but Yosemite will make us more productive than ever.  With a nod to iOS, a click on the new tabs icon or keystroke "Command + Shift + \",  instantly brings you into a screen where you can see all of the open tabs on your machine, arranged neatly and grouped by site so you can quickly switch between them.

#9. Send Links to Social Media and Recent Recipients Share a link with the world with the share icon (the box with an arrow pointing  up) or, If you’re constantly sharing links with your friends, Safari will help you send them out even faster. At the bottom of the sharing menu, you’ll find a list of recent recipients; just click one and it’ll open the appropriate message with the “To” field already filled out.

#10. Safari Sync History When we you a bookmark on your iPhone you expect it to pop up when you log into Safari on our Mac, but in Yosemite Apple has a new trick up iCloud’s sleeve. No longer do we have to leave tabs open to access sites between devices; when you browse using Safari in Yosemite, your history will automatically sync with your other devices, including anything you may have cleared. Now that's cools.

 #11. Annotate Attachments in Mail Mail is a versatile message manager, and things only get better in Yosemite. If you want to highlight something on a photo, or make a note on a PDF, you no longer need to do your work in an image editor first; after attaching it, click on the small arrow in the top-right corner of the photo and you’ll get a menu of editing options, including type, lines, shapes, and drawing tools.

#12. Fix Your Crude Drawings in Markup It's not easy to make neat lines using a trackpad is it? So, rather than letting you send scribbles that look like they were done by a monkey, Markup will instantly recognize what you're trying to draw. To use it, click the menu button that appears in the top-right of the attachment when you mouse over it.

#13. Sign PDFs in Mail While OS X has offered the ability to sign PDFs since the days of Leopard, Apple has streamlines it with Yosemite. Users previously had to open documents in the Preview app to sign a PDF, now it's part of Markup in Mail; simply click the new "add signature" icon in the pop-up menu and you’ll be able to sign your document, either by using the trackpad or scanning your Herbie Hancock with the camera.

#14. Pick up Where You Left off with Handoff Apple has integrated iOS and OS X like "Bam!", and nowhere is that more evident than in the Handoff feature. If you're working on something in a supported app on your iPad or iPhone, you'll see an icon appear on the left of the Finder; click on it and your work will instantly be beamed to your Mac, letting you pick up right where you left off. And when you're done, you can send it right back.

iPhone on Mac with iOS 8 and Yosemite

Yosemite, the next OS X along with iOS 8 coming this fall will have a great feature, that I look forward to. Answering my iPhone on my Mac.

That’s right, you can now make and receive phone calls on you Mac. According to Apple,

“When your iPhone rings, you’ll get a notification on your Mac showing you the caller’s name, number, and profile picture".  When clime the notification to answer, your Mace suddenly becomes a speakerphone. But it doesn’t end there, you can also dial out by clicking a phone number see in Contacts, Calendar, Messages, or Safari.  Simply make sure that your iPhone and Mac are on the same Wi-Fi network.

How about sending text messages and not just iMessage? Yosemite and and iPhone running iOS 8 have you covered.  You will be able to send and receive SMS and MMS text message from you Mac.  I love that I can send iMessages to my family and friends from my Mac, but now, forget about it, I’m in love.  My friends in the “green bubbles” will now have the same privilege as those in the “blue bubbles”, all from my Mac.
Apple is also introducing Handoff. If your devices are near each other, they can automatically pass whatever you’re doing from one to another.
Example: You are writing an email on you Mac but your wife is wanting to leave right now. Switch to your phone and continue the message without losing your place, get the car (passenger seat because you don’t want to type an email and drive at the same time), and go.
According to Apple “Handoff works with Mail, Safari, Pages, Numbers, Keynote, Maps, Messages, Reminders, Calendar, and Contacts.  And app developers can easily build Handoff into their apps”. So me may see more uses of Handoff in the future.