MacBook

WWDC Part 3: iMacs and Notebooks

For those who have been waiting patiently to buy a new iMac or Mac notebook, now’s the time. Apple refreshed the entire iMac line with Intel’s latest processors, faster storage, higher performance graphics, and brighter, more colorful screens. They all provide a pair of Thunderbolt 3 ports for driving external displays and connecting to speedy external storage.

The most-improved award goes to the 21.5-inch iMac with 4K Retina display, which should see the most performance gains from faster CPUs and high-performance Radeon Pro graphics processors. Plus, that model can now take up to 32 GB of RAM, up from 16 GB — it’s far more compelling than before, if you don’t need the larger screen and better performance of the 27-inch model.

You can buy a 21.5-inch non-Retina iMac starting at $1099, a 21.5-inch iMac with 4K Retina display starting at $1299, and a 27-inch iMac with 5K Retina display starting at $1799.

Looking for more performance than even a tricked-out 27-inch Retina iMac can provide?. Wait for December, when Apple promises to release the new iMac Pro. It’s a workstation-class machine that retains the form factor of the 27-inch Retina iMac but swaps the brushed aluminum look for a space gray finish. It will be the fastest Mac ever, thanks to 8-core, 10-core, or 18-core Intel Xeon CPUs. Other performance enhancements include a next-generation Radeon Pro Vega graphics chip, up to 128 GB of RAM, a 1 TB SSD upgradeable to 4 TB, four Thunderbolt 3 ports, and 10 Gbps Ethernet. It won’t come cheap, with prices starting at $4999 and rising quickly with build-to-order options.

On the portable front, Apple’s top-of-the-line MacBook Pro notebooks should run a bit more quickly thanks to the addition of Intel’s latest processors running at slightly higher clock speeds. These models also get new graphics processors that improve rendering performance. The 13-inch MacBook Pro still starts at $1299 or $1799 for a model with a Touch Bar and beefier specs. The 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar starts at $2399.

For those who value portability over all else, the MacBook has become more attractive due to improvements that address its previously underwhelming performance. Along with sprightlier CPUs, it has a new SSD that Apple claims is up to 50% faster, and you can now buy it with 16 GB of RAM, up from the previous limit of 8 GB. It’s still a bit pricey for its performance, with two models priced starting at $1299 and $1599.

If you don’t have much to spend, consider the $999 13-inch MacBook Air. Apple gave it a minor speed bump, replacing the stock 1.6 GHz Intel Core i5 processor with a 1.8 GHz version. It remains upgradeable to an Intel Core i7 running at 2.2 GHz.

By the way, if you’ve been jonesing for a full-size wireless keyboard, you’ll be pleased to learn that Apple also just released the new wireless Magic Keyboard with Numeric Keypad. It’s $129.

Must-Have Accessories

Must-Have Accessories
Must-Have Accessories

Did you get a new device this holiday season?  Perhaps it was something that you purchased for yourself - a tablet, a phone, a TV, laptop, etc.  But your question is: now what do I do with this?  How can I accessorize my new favorite device and utilize it for all its worth? Let’s take a look at some of our favorite accessories for your holiday devices.

Cables

Most of your devices came with a cable, but let’s face it, you can never have enough of them. If it’s for your phone, you need one in your bedroom, the car, your purse, next to the computer, and an extra one because you know one of them might grow legs and simply walk away.

Getting extra lightning cables for your iPhone/iPad is a no brainer, but consider trying out the Moshi lightning cable for a little style and have the same one-year-warranty as the Apple brand.

You got the new Apple TV but it didn’t come with a HDMI cable and you need one to make it work. Did you know that when you AirPlay to the AppleTV it doubles your local traffic? Get yourself an ethernet cable to connect your AppleTV directly to your router for the fastest speed.

Battery Pack

Your new iOS device has a nice battery life, but it won’t always be like that. If you plan on going camping, traveling on a plane, or going beyond the range of an outlet, then you’re going to want to get some power on the go. The Moshi Ionbank 5K comes with an integrated Lightning cable to charge your iPhone, and a USB cable to charge itself. The extra USB port on IonBank 5K allows for a second device to charge, whether it be another iPhone or even an Android device.

Protection

Your new device looks pretty sweet and you should keep it that way.  With the i10 Pixel glass you can keep the glass scratch-free as it reaches to the top corners of your phone from the bottom corners. For full phone protection, look at the cases from Moshi.  They range in design from sleek to rugged, and even offer a wallet folio case. These cases keep your devices safe and in style.

Your computer should be protected from scratches as well. The Speck see-thru lets your Apple logo light glow through the case and gives it the protection needed from daily wear and tear, like sliding it into your full backpack.

What about a folio for the businessman/woman to look professional and have protection? The Tucano Palmo and Leggero are a great protective solution with a style that says, "Look out, I look good, I look important, I am successful." If you are looking for a folio that has a keyboard, look no further than the Moshi Versa Cover with keyboard; this bad boy turns heads.

Headphones

You’re probably going to lose these in a pocket, in the wash, in the car, leave them at a friend's house... you get the idea, you're going to lose them. And the headphones that came with you iPhone are average at best. The Moshi Mythro headphones are your answer to the average headphones; they're only $29.95 and according to CNet, they are the best headphones under $50.

Cleaning

No one likes fingerprints on screens, and the germs on your computer aren’t very attractive either. Apple Juice screen and device cleaner provides you with cleanliness, and it smells like apples.

Learning curve

You have the devices but don’t know all the ins and outs of how to utilize them most effectively. Understanding the benefits of iCloud seems beyond your grasp, and how to make a document look like you hired someone to make it is something weighing on your mind.  ME.Training can give you the advantages you’ve been looking for. Sign up for a private class with a trainer and get the undivided attention you deserve.

AirPort Time Capsule

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Automatic backup

  • AirPort Time Capsule is designed to work with Time Machine in OS X for automatic, continuous backup protection
  • Backups happen wirelessly, eliminating the need to find and connect a cable
  • Back up and store files for multiple Macs running Mac OS X v10.5 Leopard or later on your wireless network
  • Built-in 2TB or 3TB hard drive gives you all the capacity and safety you need

Share a hard drive and printer

  • The USB port lets you share a printer or hard drive and access it wirelessly

High performance

  • AirPort Time Capsule is a full-featured router with an integrated access point – so not only is it your backup storage, it also provides Wi-Fi and Ethernet connectivity to all your devices
  • Ultra-fast 802.11ac with beam-forming technology enables data rates up to 1.3 Gbps - triple the previous 802.11n standard, which means up to three times faster Wi-Fi
  • With simultaneous dual-band Wi-Fi, your Wi-Fi devices get the fastest possible wireless performance and best possible range

Easy setup

  • With the setup assistant built into iOS and OS X, you're just a few taps or clicks away from setting up or extending a wireless network
  • Once your network is set up, AirPort Utility for iOS and OS C lets you manage and monitory your AirPort Time Capsule from your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch or Mac

Ports

  • One Gigabit Ethernet WAN port for connecting a DSL or cable modem
  • Three Gigabit Ethernet LAN ports for connecting computer or network devices
  • One USB 2.0 port for connecting a USB printer or USB hard drive

Compatibility

  • Works with Wi-Fi Certified 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11n, or 802.11ac enabled Mac computers, iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Apple TV, Windows-based PCs, and other Wi-Fi enabled devices

Models and price

 

  • Apple AirPort TimeCapsule 2 TB
  • $299
  • Apple AirPort TimeCapsule 3 TB
  • $399

MacBook

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MacBook

At just 2 pounds and 13.1mm thin, MacBook is our thinnest and lightest notebook and it’s available in three gorgeous metal finishes. With a stunning 12-inch Retina display, Apple-designed keyboard and all-new Force Touch trackpad, it features fifth-generation Intel Core M processors, fast PCIe-based flash storage, and all-day battery life. MacBook is designed for a wireless world and is the ideal notebook for customers looking for the complete Mac experience in our most portable notebook ever.

Thin and light design

  • At just 2 pounds and 13.1mm thin, MacBook is the thinnest and lightest mac notebook ever
  • Comes with an all-new keyboard, Force Touch trackpad, USB-C port, and high-resolution 12-inch Retina display
  • Available in three gorgeous metal finishes - Gold, Space Gray, Silver

Stunning 12-inch Retina display

  • With over 3 million pixels and 2304-by-1440 resolution, you can experience vivid images with astounding clarity
  • Edge-to-edge glass display with IPS technology and a 178° viewing angle
  • Optimized pixel design enables a bright, power-efficient display

New Apple-designed keyboard

  • Full-size keyboard with butterfly mechanism for precise key movement
  • Larger, thinner keys designed for a comfortable typing experience
  • Each key has its own LED for a uniformly backlit keyboard

All-new Force Touch trackpad

  • Force sensors allow you to click anywhere with a uniform feel
  • Customizable click sensitivity
  • Taptic Engine delivers click sensations through haptic feedback
  • Use Force click for easier access to helpful tools and information
  • Fast forward or zoom by gradually applying pressure to the trackpad
  • Supports all the Multi-Touch gestures Mac users love

Versatile USB-C port

  • New industry standard USB-C port for charging, USB 3.1 transfer, and native DisplayPort video output with adapter support for HDMI and VGA
  • Small, reversible design that's one-third the size of a current USB port
  • New compact USB-C power adapter and charging cable included

Other key technologies

  • 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0
  • FaceTime camera for video calls
  • Headphone port and dual microphones

All-day batter life

  • New terraced, countered batteries allow for 35% more capacity for all-day battery life
  • Up to 9 hours of wireless web
  • Up to 10 Hours of iTunes movie playback

Models and Price

  • 256GB PCIe-based onboard flash storage
  • 1.1GHz dual-core Intel Core M processor Turbo Boost up to 2.4GHz
  • 8GB memory
  • Intel HD Graphics 5300
  • $1,299.00

 

  • 512GB PCIe-based onboard flash storage
  • 1.2GHz dual-core Intel Core M processor Turbo Boost up to 2.6GHz
  • 8GB memory
  • Intel HD Graphics 5300
  • $1,599.00

 

Protecting Your Investment with a Case

Did you know when you protect your device with a case, it maintains its value better than if left unprotected?  When our technicians value a computer or any device for trade in, we run a lot of tests on it, but we also look at the condition of the device. The better it looks, the more it's worth.  Let's be honest, no one wants to buy anything used that looks like it's been through the ringer. If you're going to spend your hard-earned dollars on a MacBook or an iPad 2 or keep track of your whole life on your iPhone, you really should protect it.

That's why we offer cases for your devices, from see thru Speck cases to the Moshi Overture wallet cases.

Moshi20 Speck20

Training Sale until 12/24/15

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Training-20

Training on Mac OS X  and iOS

Don't feel like a child on your computer, iPad or iPhone again.  Training with a MacExperience specialist is... special. Our team of trainers work with you in a non-intimidating, one on one atmosphere. Have a specific question or problem, our team will help you get things sorted out.  Maybe you want to be more proficient with your device, or understand iCloud, or maybe how to make a book from photos.  Let us help you impress your friends and colleagues.

Take advantage of our 20% off sale from December 11th through December 24th, 2015.

Introducing ME.Complete core protection plan

You love your Mac.  When you first open up that box, and touch your new Mac, you think to yourself, “I’m going to take such good care of you”. It’s exciting!  You’ve taken all the precautions needed, you’ve even added the recommended AppleCare. Each morning you sit in front of your Mac with your coffee next to it, but not so close that you might bump into it and spill coffee on your new precious Mac.  But then your idiot roommate, wonderful spouse, or first-born child bumps into your coffee and OOPS!

At MacExperience we recommend AppleCare with every new Mac. It extends your one-year hardware warranty to three years, and you get access to Apple’s technical phone support. While AppleCare covers manufacturer’s defects and hardware issues, it does not cover accidental damage.

That’s why we’re introducing ME.Complete for only $99

CompleteBlogBanner
CompleteBlogBanner

Accidental damages can be expensive. Depending on the model and the amount of damage you may spend $300 - $900+ on a repair.  Liquid damage can be even more devastating, costing you an arm and a leg. Even with AppleCare, accidental damage like drops and liquid spills are not covered.

With ME.Complete, all you pay is a $250 service fee in the case that your Mac breaks as a result of accidental damage. Our Apple Authorized Service Center will get your computer up and running as quickly as possible.

With ME.Complete, your Mac is completely covered and protected. AppleCare will make sure you get free repairs for any hardware issues and ME.Complete covers you in case of accidental damage. ME.Complete also includes a $75 credit towards replacing a consumed battery, ensuring your computer will always be up and running 100%.

A break down of your coverage options

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Comparison-Chart

One last thing to remember

ME.Complete is a great way to keep you covered when __________  happens, but your data on your computer is not covered. What are you doing to save your data in the case of a hard drive failure? It's wise to have a back up, and every Mac includes a program called Time Machine that backs your Mac to an external hard drive.  All you need is an external hard drive or Time Capsule to get going.

Sign PDFs with TrackPad

Ever had to sign documents quickly and return them to a sender? No matter the type of document that you're trying to sign, if you can avoid a printing, then sign, then scan, and send back workflow, it's always appreciated. Mac OS X's Preview application has long allowed for digital signatures, but in Yosemite you can sign documents using the trackpad, too.

Create a Signature with your TrackPad

  • Step 1: Open PDF that you wish to sign in the Preview App.
  • Step 2: Click View
  • Step 3: Click Show Markup Toolbar (Command + Shift + A)
  • Step 4: Chose the Sign button in the tool bar that appears, then click "Create Signature"
  • Step 5: In the Signature popup that appears, choose the Trackpad option , and click the "Click here to begin" button.

Once in this mode, sign you name using your finger on the trackpad.

When you are done with your signature, press any key on the keyboard to exit editing mode, and then press the Done button in the popup to save the signature in Preview.

You can also get a signature without the trackpad. To do so, follow the same steps as above, but choose the Camera option in step 5. Create a physical signature using black ink on a white piece of paper (for best results), then hold this signature up to the iSight camera on your Mac.

Use your Signature

When you are ready to use the signature in your document, follow these steps:

  • Step 1: Click View.
  • Step 2: Click Show Markup Toolbar (Command + Shift + A ).
  • Step 3: Choose the Sign button, then click on one of the saved signatures that appears in the list.

Once you do this, you'll see the signature inserted into the document. You can then resize and move the signature around on the PDF to make it look just right and fit over the signature area of the document you're signing.

Don't forget you need to save the signature inside of the document using Command + S (or get advanced save options by pressing Option + Command + Shift + S to open the Save As... panel).

Spring Forward with New Stuff from Apple

Here is the skinny of what went down at the Apple Live event.

ResearchKit

Now you can do your part to advance medical research from your iPhone.

Apple TV

Price drop from $99 to $69.  It looks like they are trying to be more competitive with the other streaming devices out there.

MacBook

This is an all new machine.  It’s thin, it has retina display, a new keyboard, a new trackpad, and USB-C.  Shipping April 10.

The specs: $1299 / 12 inch Retina display 2304X1440 / 0.14” to 0.52” thin / 2 lbs. / Three colors to choose from, Space Grey, Gold, Silver / 9 hour battery life / 1.1GHz dual-core Intel Core M / 8GB Ram / 256GB SSD / USB-C Charging, USB 3.1, Native DisplayPort 1.2 video output. / 480p FaceTime Camera / Stereo speakers / Dual Microphones / Headphone jack out / ForceTouch trackpad Force sensors detect how much pressure you’re applying to give you new capabilities and haptic feedback.

MacBook Pro 13”

Now with ForceTouch Trackpad, Fifth-gen Intel Core processors, faster flash storage, and longer battery life. No price change.

Apple WatchAppleWatch

Available April 24. It’s like having your phone on your wrist.  AppleCare+ available (price TBD)

Apple Watch Sport - $349 for the 38mm Sport, $399 for the 42mm. Two colors.

Apple Watch Regular Addition - $549 – $1,049 for the 38mm. $599 – $1,099 for the 42mm Two colors.

Apple Watch Edition - Limited Quantities starting at $10,000

My opinion

ResearchKit is great.  Let’s find cures together as long as Apple keeps our medical info secure.  There could be a long list of questions, hopefully Apple has addressed them already.

The AppleTV has always been one of my favorite products. If you don’t own anything Apple, it still works.  If you have an iPhone, iPad, or computer, it becomes even cooler.

The MacBook is very cool.  I like the three color options and how thin it is. It’s like an iPad with a keyboard an no touch screen.  A great computer, but it might be like an appliance.  Get AppleCare and insurance (available at MacExperience) for it.

The AppleWatch.  I wouldn’t have one. To me, it’s like a phone on my wrist, but my phone has to near me to use it.  The spy-like features are pretty cool if you want to look like you work for MI-6.   If you get one PLEASE get AppleCare+ for it.

Must-Know Tips & Tricks for OS X Yosemite

If you have upgraded to Yosemite you've seen some changes visually but may not know the benefits of the update. If you haven't upgraded to Yosemite, we recommend backing your computer up before you upgrade. There are a ton of new features included in this update that make life a little sweeter and make your friends looking through windows jelly.  Here is just a pinch of what you can now do.

#1. Answer and make phone calls

If you have an iPhone (5 or later), you can now make and receive phone calls on your Mac computer. Simply make sure you're on the same Wi-Fi network and are using the same iCloud account on both devices.

When you're in the Messages app, go to Preferences -> Accounts and make sure your number is checked. Now, anytime you receive a phone call, you'll get a notification at the top right of your computer screen where you can choose to accept or decline it.

To make a call, go to FaceTime and either enter the number you want to call or hit the phone icon next to a recent number under the Audio tab.

Bonus: In addition to Yosemite, Wi-Fi calling via iPhone also works on the iPad Air, iPad mini, and iPad mini with Retina display.

#2. Receive & Send SMS Text Messages

While you've been able to send iMessages to other iOS users directly from your computer, regular text messages were still relegated to your iPhone. Now, thanks to SMS Relay, you can send text messages directly from the Messages app on your Mac.

Set up the iMessage app on your Mac with your iCloud credentials. Leave the app open on your Mac and, on your iOS device, navigate to Settings -> Messages -> Text Message Forwarding. Once you see your device listed, toggle it on. You may also be required to input a verification code, so make sure to leave iMessage open on your Mac to receive it.

#3. Name Your Group Messages When we’re talking with a group of friends, it’s usually about something specific, you can now label your conversations accordingly. Click the Details button inside a group message and you’ll see an option to give it a name. It’ll also sync the title with all of your other devices, so you won’t lose track of it.

#4. Stop blowing up my phone Sometimes you just don't want to be bothered by the onslaught of a back-and-forth group message. In Yosemite you won’t have to anymore. Inside the Details window are two ways to put a stop to the distractions: Turn on Do Not Disturb to stop getting notifications every time someone has a reply, or leave the conversation entirely. And like everything else, whatever you decide will be reflected on all of your devices.

#5. Smarter Spotlight Search Spotlight has been greatly enhanced in Yosemite, evolving from a simple system searcher to a full-fledged information center always at the ready. Just press Command-Space and the behemoth search field will automatically pop up in the middle of the screen. You can use it to hunt for long-lost files hidden in dark corners of your hard drive and it can find just about anything else you may be looking for: maps, trailers, definitions, songs, phone numbers... even pictures of The Fonz on his Triumph, if you're looking to be cool like him.

#6. New Tricks for Spotlight Spotlight can help you in a variety of new ways: Need currency conversion? Or maybe you need to know how many miles are in 24 kilometers or what 211 degrees Fahrenheit looks like in Celsius? How about movie times? Spotlight's got you covered.

211 degrees
211 degrees

#7. Find your Safari Favorites Apple has ditched the bookmark bar in Safari 8 for a cleaner browsing experience. Of course, you can still get to them with the dropdown menu or the sidebar, but Apple has given us a much easier method in Yosemite: just click inside the address bar and a "grid" of your favorites magically appear. If you want, you can still have the "old-fashioned" bar, bring it back in the View settings.

#8. See All of Your Open Tabs is Safari Tabs have always been a part of our multitasking workflow, but Yosemite will make us more productive than ever.  With a nod to iOS, a click on the new tabs icon or keystroke "Command + Shift + \",  instantly brings you into a screen where you can see all of the open tabs on your machine, arranged neatly and grouped by site so you can quickly switch between them.

#9. Send Links to Social Media and Recent Recipients Share a link with the world with the share icon (the box with an arrow pointing  up) or, If you’re constantly sharing links with your friends, Safari will help you send them out even faster. At the bottom of the sharing menu, you’ll find a list of recent recipients; just click one and it’ll open the appropriate message with the “To” field already filled out.

#10. Safari Sync History When we you a bookmark on your iPhone you expect it to pop up when you log into Safari on our Mac, but in Yosemite Apple has a new trick up iCloud’s sleeve. No longer do we have to leave tabs open to access sites between devices; when you browse using Safari in Yosemite, your history will automatically sync with your other devices, including anything you may have cleared. Now that's cools.

 #11. Annotate Attachments in Mail Mail is a versatile message manager, and things only get better in Yosemite. If you want to highlight something on a photo, or make a note on a PDF, you no longer need to do your work in an image editor first; after attaching it, click on the small arrow in the top-right corner of the photo and you’ll get a menu of editing options, including type, lines, shapes, and drawing tools.

#12. Fix Your Crude Drawings in Markup It's not easy to make neat lines using a trackpad is it? So, rather than letting you send scribbles that look like they were done by a monkey, Markup will instantly recognize what you're trying to draw. To use it, click the menu button that appears in the top-right of the attachment when you mouse over it.

#13. Sign PDFs in Mail While OS X has offered the ability to sign PDFs since the days of Leopard, Apple has streamlines it with Yosemite. Users previously had to open documents in the Preview app to sign a PDF, now it's part of Markup in Mail; simply click the new "add signature" icon in the pop-up menu and you’ll be able to sign your document, either by using the trackpad or scanning your Herbie Hancock with the camera.

#14. Pick up Where You Left off with Handoff Apple has integrated iOS and OS X like "Bam!", and nowhere is that more evident than in the Handoff feature. If you're working on something in a supported app on your iPad or iPhone, you'll see an icon appear on the left of the Finder; click on it and your work will instantly be beamed to your Mac, letting you pick up right where you left off. And when you're done, you can send it right back.

Security Alert: Backdoor iWorm

Hello Mac Users, MacExperience wants to keep everyone informed and updated on the latest Mac OS Security issues.

Most Mac computer users know malware is less common on Macs than on Windows. Even though Apple provides built in security such as GateKeeper and File Quarantine, Mac users should not take their OS X security for granted

Macs aren’t immune to malware. Recently, there have been many issues of Malware infecting Mac computers like Genieo. Additionally, a new Mac Malware called Mac.Backdoor.iWorm is making rounds infecting Mac computers to be used as Botnets.

Therefore, MacExperience recommends some steps you can take to improve your security on Mac computers. Here are some easy ways you can improve your Mac security.

1. Keep your OS X software updated with the latest patches and OS software updates.

2. Set GateKeeper to only run digitally signed apps from the Mac App Store. This setting is in System preferences under Security and Privacy. 

3. Run anti-virus/anti-malware software on your Macs.

Mac computers have become very popular. As a result, more malicious code is being written to take advantage of unprotected computers.

4. Limit the use of Administrator accounts

Allow only necessary admin accounts to install and modify system settings. Don’t share administrator names and passwords. Log out when you leave your Mac so unauthorized people don’t use your Mac with administrator privileges. Require a password to wake your Mac from sleep or screen saver.

Contact MacExperience

For more information on Mac Security solutions for home or your business. MacExperience offers solutions to protect your personal or business assets.

 

Other recent OS X security news:

Also in the news was the known security issue regarding the Bash exploit. The OS X bash update can be found directly at Apple.com.

http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1769

More on GateKeeper: http://support.apple.com/kb/ht5290

*** UPDATE: Oct. 7th *** Apple has added the new iWorm definitions to detect this malware.

How to pin an app to a specific Mission Control Desktop

How to pin an app to a specific Mission Control Desktop Mission Control 101

 

You can assign an app to a specific desktop in Mission Control—perfect for keeping your programs in their proper “spaces,” particularly when you’re booting up your Mac.

 

Before we begin, something to keep in mind: this trick applies only to apps running in standard  “windowed” mode. Programs running in “full screen” automatically get assigned to their own desktops.

 

Related: Desktop "Spaces in Mission Control

 

Are you ready to start “pinning” your apps to specific desktops? Here we go…

Just select “This Desktop” to pin an app to a specific Mission Control desktop.

▪ First, navigate to the desktop where you’d like a particular program to call home. If, for example, you want Calendar to sit in Desktop 2, launch Mission Control, then click on Desktop 2 from the overhead Mission Control view (or create a second desktop if there isn’t one already).

▪ Launch the app you want to assign to the desktop—again, let’s use Calendar as our example.

▪ Go down to the Mac desktop dock at the bottom of the screen, find the icon for Calendar, and right-click it.

▪ In the menu that appears, select Options, then select “This Desktop” under the “Assign to” heading.

 

Now, let’s test. Go ahead and close the app you just assigned to a desktop, navigate to Desktop 1 in Mission Control, then launch the app again—and when you do, it should launch in the desktop you assigned it to.

 

Also, if the app you’ve pinned to a desktop opens automatically when you start up your Mac, the app will now launch in its assigned window.

 

 

OK, but what if you want to “unpin” an app from a desktop? Just right-click its icon in the dock, select Options, then select “None” under “Assign to.”

Desktop "Spaces" in Mission Control

Mission Control 103 Did you know that there’s more than one desktop on your Mac? Yep, it’s true, you can pretty much have as many desktops as you want, each filled with its own assortment of open documents and applications.

Most of us are used to having a single desktop on our systems—you know, the one that’s directly in front of us. The idea of have more, “virtual” desktop spaces with open windows that you can’t see can take a little getting used to. Once you get the hang of it, these additional desktop spaces—which you manage in Mac OS X with a new feature, dubbed “Mission Control”—can become addicting, even essential. Let’s take a quick tour of the desktop spaces in “Mission Control”—and keep in mind that older versions of the Mac operating system also have the “spaces” feature, which you can manage in the System Preferences panel under the Apple menu.

mission control 104

1. First, activate Mission Control by clicking its icon in the Mac OS “Dock,” or swiping up with three fingertips on your MacBook trackpad. You can also turn Mission Control on by hitting the F3 key on your keyboard.

 

2. Now, you’ll see an overhead view of all your open applications, windows, and spaces. On your desktop, you may have five applications open—Mail, iPhoto, iCal, iTunes, and Safari, not to mention a total of three Safari open windows at once. Things may start to get a little crowded.

mission control 106

3. Time to spread out a little bit. Activate Mission Control again, click and hold the app window you want to move to a different “desktop”, and then drag it up and over to the upper-right corner of the screen—where all of a sudden, a new “space” with a big “+” sign appears.

4. Drop the app into your new space, and presto! Now you have another desktop with just the one application open. To visit your new space, just activate Mission Control and click the Desktop icon, which immediately zooms in and fills your screen.

mission control 107

5. Now go ahead repeat with more open applications. To switch between your desktops, open Mission Control and click the desktop space you want to jump to. You can also scroll though them one-by-one with a sideways three-finger swipe on your trackpad, or by tapping a left or right arrow key on the keyboard while holding down the Control key.

Mission Control 101

6. Want to clean up your spaces? Activate Mission Control, then hold your mouse over the space you want to close until a circle with an “x” appears on its corner. Click the “x,” and the space will disappear, with any open windows safely sliding over to one of your remaining spaces (so don’t worry, you won’t lose any work).

Give it a try!

Paste Text Without Keeping Its Formatting

When you copy text from some applications, and especially from the web, you tend to copy its formatting, such as the text size, font choice and so on. When you then paste this into other text fields, like in an email, it looks funky or out of place, and can make things hard to read. To paste the text without its original formatting (so it formats in the same way as the rest of what you're pasting into), instead of pressing Command (⌘) +V, press Option+Shift+Command (⌘) +V.

Shortcut Your Most Used Phrases

If you find yourself typing the same things over and over, whether it’s a single Unicode character that doesn’t have a keyboard shortcut, or an entire phrase or chunk of text like an email signature, use the built-in Text Replacement feature in OS X.  

Go to the Text tab of the Keyboard pane of the System preferences and click the +. Put the shortcut you want in the left column and the text you want it to expand in the right.

Keep Your Hands at 10 and 2

Did you know that you can switch between apps with a key command.  Command (⌘) + Tab then release allows the user to switch to the previously used application.  If you are doing research between two applications this simple step is great.  This interface is more flexible than it seems at first. For instance, if you bring the App Switcher up and hover your cursor over an icon then release “Command (⌘)”, it will go to the application you highlighted. App Switcher

Also, when you have an application highlighted, you can do a few other things: press Q to quit an app instantly; press H to hide an app from view; or press the up or down arrows to see the highlighted app’s open windows in Mission Control.

 

One last thing that I find helpful with the App Switcher is that you can scroll back and forth to choose the app you want with your left pinky.  Command (⌘) + Tab goes left to right and Command (⌘) + Tilde ( ~ ) will go right to left once the App Switcher is activated.

Dictate text using Enhanced Dictation

We all know we aren’t supposed to text and drive.  Reason being, people take their eyes off of the road for 5 seconds at 60 miles and hour and you’ve just driven 1 1/2 football fields.  So we’ve use Siri to read the text to us and to dictate a text back without ever taking our eyes off the road. But what about when your on the computer and you just want to get your thoughts out, but your fingers can keep up.  Did you know that your Mac OS 10.9 has enhanced dictation?  That right, talk to your computer and let it do the typing for you.

If this is something you would like to use, we recommend downloading the 800MB option, which moves the voice recognition to you local computer without the need of an internet connection, making it must faster and more reliable.

Enough of the mumbo jumbo.  Let’s turn this on so that we can use it already.

Setup. Go to the Apple menu > System Preferences > Dictation & Speech. Turn on Dictation then check the box for “Use Enhanced Dictation”. Once it has downloaded you are ready to rock-n-roll.

How to Use. This is difficult so pay attention.  Place your curser where you want to insert your text.  Then press the function key (fn) twice. Speak. Press the function key (fn) again (but only once) to end.  OK, maybe it wasn’t that hard.  You can use words like “period” “exclamation mark” and “new paragraph”.  If there is a question about the dictation, it will be underlined in purple. Right click the purple underlined words to see other things dictation thinks you might have said.

Dictation

iPhone on Mac with iOS 8 and Yosemite

Yosemite, the next OS X along with iOS 8 coming this fall will have a great feature, that I look forward to. Answering my iPhone on my Mac.

That’s right, you can now make and receive phone calls on you Mac. According to Apple,

“When your iPhone rings, you’ll get a notification on your Mac showing you the caller’s name, number, and profile picture".  When clime the notification to answer, your Mace suddenly becomes a speakerphone. But it doesn’t end there, you can also dial out by clicking a phone number see in Contacts, Calendar, Messages, or Safari.  Simply make sure that your iPhone and Mac are on the same Wi-Fi network.

How about sending text messages and not just iMessage? Yosemite and and iPhone running iOS 8 have you covered.  You will be able to send and receive SMS and MMS text message from you Mac.  I love that I can send iMessages to my family and friends from my Mac, but now, forget about it, I’m in love.  My friends in the “green bubbles” will now have the same privilege as those in the “blue bubbles”, all from my Mac.
Apple is also introducing Handoff. If your devices are near each other, they can automatically pass whatever you’re doing from one to another.
Example: You are writing an email on you Mac but your wife is wanting to leave right now. Switch to your phone and continue the message without losing your place, get the car (passenger seat because you don’t want to type an email and drive at the same time), and go.
According to Apple “Handoff works with Mail, Safari, Pages, Numbers, Keynote, Maps, Messages, Reminders, Calendar, and Contacts.  And app developers can easily build Handoff into their apps”. So me may see more uses of Handoff in the future.

Alternate iMessage Email

How to set up an alternate iMessage email address. From an iOS device:

1. Select the device you wish to change.

2. Go to Settings > Messages > Send & Receive > add another email

3. type the email you want to add.

4. Wait for a verification email from Apple.  In the verification email you will need to follow the Link.

 

If you are wanting to change the email address for messages on your computer...

1. Launch Messages.

2. choose messages from the menu bar.

3. Select Preferences

4. select accounts