Kids

Families and Apple ID's

Dear Dad, Mom, and children, Do you ever get frustrated with your Apple Devices sharing content, pictures, texts, and apps with other family members? We examine a few scenarios and give some sound advice to solve these conundrums.

[quote author="Mom" bar="true" align="left" width="full"]Every time my daughter downloads an app, it shows up on my phone too.  How do I prevent that?[/quote]

[quote author="Dad, Mom, and Teens" bar="true" align="left" width="full"]I have a warning on my phone that says there is not enough space to back up.  What does this mean? How do I take care of it?[/quote]

I get questions like these quite often from families that visit our stores.  I almost always reply with a question, “Do you share the same apple id”?  Usually the answer is yes.

I’m a husband of one and a father of three.  We’ve gone through this headache as well.  I’ve discovered, along the way, a 3 simple steps that can be done to keep everything easy and uncomplicated.

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[toggle title="1. New ID for Jr."] Create an Apple ID for each person in the house.  In order to do this, each person will also need an email address. [/toggle]

[toggle title="2. Protect the Password"] Do not tell your child the password to the apple ID. This does a few things. First, it forces them to have to come to you for approval of purchase. This is really nice if you have your credit card attached to the Apple ID. Secondly you know what they are viewing, listening to, and playing.  Some of you may not want to have your credit card associated with your child’s Apple ID. That’s fine, set them up with an iTunes gift card.  You can even pay your children for work performed or reward them, with iTunes gift cards. Then, when they run out of money on that gift card, but want to purchase something, you have an opportunity to teach them something that even the government should learn.  That you can’t spend what you don’t have. [/toggle]

[toggle title="3. Take it With You"] When your child grows up and leaves the house, they can take their music, apps, books and a financial understanding with them, and there is no arguing over who owns what. [/toggle]

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I know that to some this may seem like a hassle, but when you set this up early, you can avoid headaches later.  Each person has their own iCloud backup so you wont be trying to connect 5 devices to one iCloud that would eat up the 5GB of free space extremely fast.

[quote author="Husband and Wife" bar="true" align="left" width="full"] I don't want to separate our Apple ID's, it's just the two of us. [/quote]

Some of you just don’t want to go that route, perhaps there is only two of you in the house and that’s fine.  The question still remains though, how do you separate who gets what on which device?  There are some steps that actually work.

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[toggle title="Scenario #1 My wife or child gets all of my text."]

Let’s clear the air just a bit so there is no confusion.  Text Message and iMessage are not the same thing.  The typical text message is sent through a cellular data service provider (Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, or whoever), and is transferred to the recipient. Depending on your cell phone plan, you could be charged for the text message. But then there is iMessage, when you send a text message to someone that has an Apple ID, the Messages app automatically recognizes that person’s Apple ID and routes the message through Apple’s servers instead of using the cell phone carrier and avoids texting charges from the carrier.

To be clear, your wife or child is not intercepting all text messages, just the iMessages.  To prevent that from continuing, we need to make an adjustment.

On your device go to

Settings > Messages > Send & Receive

Then select or deselect how that device can receive iMessages.  You can choose the phone number associated with the phone, the Apple ID, or any email address you choose.  If you do decide to use a different email follow the instructions on our Alternate iMessage Email guide.

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[toggle title="Scenario #2 When my child/husband downloads an app, it appears on my device."]

Simply turn off automatic downloads option. On your device select

Settings > iTunes & App Store > Automatic Downloads

This section has the option to have Automatic Downloads turned on for Music, Apps, Books and Updates.itunesAppstore-iconibooksAppstore-icon[/toggle]

[toggle title="Scenario #3 We want to share music, but not all of it."]

Like Scenario 2, you need to turn off automatic downloads first. There are two ways to go about this.  First you can stream via the cloud. Your music will not actually be on your device, but is available to stream if you have a wifi connection or a cellular connection.  Remember though, rates may apply.  The second choice is to sync the music you want through itunes on your computer.  See our Syncing via iTunes blog for further instructions.

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[toggle title="Scenario #4 (Almost Explicit Content) My 7-year-old son has seen questionable pictures of us. What do we do?"]

First, flush your sons eyes out with water. Second, explain that this is what married couples only do. Third. Turn off photo stream on his iPad.  Then set up a shared stream for only you and your wife.

Select

Settings > iCloud > Photos

Make sure that photos are turned off here on the device you do not want your Almost Explicit Content to go to.

To create a shared stream for you and you spouse go to your photos on your device.  Then select Shared at the bottom followed by the + new shared stream… Name the stream and select next.  You will be prompted to invite someone to view these photos.  Note that in order for them to participate, they must have an apple ID.

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A Guide to Guided Access

If you're the parent of a toddler who just loves to get his grubby little paws on your iPad, Guided Access can become one of your best friends. Let's find out why. Let's pretend your family is on a roadtrip, and your toddler needs some entertainment on that long trip. He just loves to watch his favorite movie. You've purchased several movies from iTunes and have loaded them on your iPad for him to enjoy. But toddlers love to press buttons to see what they do.

How can you keep him from getting access to everything, all you really need is for him to enjoy the movie.  Enter Guided Access! Tweak  a few settings, and you can set up your iPad so that the only thing he can do is watch his favorite movie!

To activate Guided Access, navigate to: Settings > General > Accessibility > Guided Access

Find in Settings > General > Accessibility > Guided Access

 

 

Flip the switch to 'On' and then tap on Set Passcode. This will be a secret, 4-digit code that you'll use to disable Guided Access when it's in use. Pick something you can remember, but don't let your toddler see.

Now that it is set up, it's time to put it to use. Here's what to do: get a video started, then triple-click on the home button. This activates Guided Access for the application.  (note: you can use this on any application, and draw "circles" around which part of the screen you don't want them to touch)

Guided Access activated with available settings

From here, there are a couple of settings that are available to choose... the hardware buttons are set to Always OFF. You can turn off Touch and leave Motion ON. Turning off Touch disables the entire touch screen, which prevents your little guy from ending his video to early.

Another option is to turn Touch on, and then select areas of the screen that you'd like to be disabled. Leaving Motion turned on still allows for the screen to orient itself based on how the iPad is being held. Once you're happy with the settings you've chosen, tap on Start in the upper right corner.

To exit out of Guided Access, triple-click the home button, and then tap in your secret 4-digit passcode. You'll be taken back to the Guided Access settings screen, where you can tap on the End button in the upper left corner, or you can tap on Resume in the upper right corner.

Triple Click home button and put secret code in to disable.

Now you can safely hand your iPad over to your child, and he's off and running, without being able to access anything else on the iPad.

5 Great Kid Apps for iPad

Kid Friendly Apps for iPadiPads are great for kids. It’s probably not wise for children to play on them all day, but when they do, here are some ideas for fun, entertaining and educational apps for their curious minds. 1) 123 Color HD: Talking Coloring Book Learning numbers, letters, shapes and colors has never been so exciting. This app allows children to color by number while learning four different languages. Voice-overs, music, sound effects and animation add to its entertainment value.

2) Star Walk HD - 5 Stars Astronomy Guide This constellation app allows you to gaze at the stars without going outside. Wherever you point your iPad, the screen will fill up with constellations that are in that area of the sky. It might be designed for an older audience, but even 5 year olds will know how to use and enjoy the app.

3) Stack the States This app makes it fun to learn about U.S. geography. While playing, kids learn state capitals, state facts, state abbreviations and state locations. Elementary-school students will love the app, and their parents will, too.

4) Mathtopia+ Needless to say, this game app is about math. It’s a race against the clock to identify multiple equations that share the same answer (for example: [3+1], [2x2], [4/1]). The sounds and colors will make math enjoyable!

5) Fruit Ninja This app isn’t exactly educational, unless you count building “finger-eye coordination.” The premise is to slice every piece of fruit that appears on the screen and earn points. It has appealing graphics, and it is easy enough for a 3 year old.

A Toddler Toilet Trainer Built for iPads?

Gadget Show iPottyThe annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas is one of the largest and most exciting tech shows in the world. Companies show off their latest gadgets and home theater equipment and demo what will be coming down the line in the future. While Apple typically holds their own events and doesn’t make a splash at CES, other companies will still show off their products made for Apple devices.

Which brings us to one of the more, shall we say, "intriguing" products at the 2013 show, the iPotty.

Every child learns potty training their own way. Some get it quickly, while some may struggle with the concept (and who can blame them, we all should be so lucky to relieve ourselves whenever we want).

But one thing that just about every toddler has in common is a love of an iPad. The iPotty is a potty training device that lets your young one “gape and paw at the iPad while taking care of business in the old-fashioned part of the plastic potty.”

There are existing potty training apps that encourage children, even one featuring Elmo.

Or maybe they just want to play their favorite game while doing the deed. Either way, the iPotty is a wacky option for parents who think their tech-saavy child needs a bit of digital encouragement to say goodbye to diapers once and for all.

Pediatricians recommend that children under 2 have no screen time on TVs, computers or mobile devices and limit to just a few hours per day for children over than that. So just allow your child to enjoy the iPad limited amounts per day and keep offer time as a reward for good behavior.

The company says the iPotty is going to be released on Amazon in March for $39.99. While we we won’t be carrying it at MacExperience, we’ll be interested to reviews from parents and kids alike.

Photo courtesy of the AP.