Insights

Who Me? An iPhone Addict?

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Smartphone addiction is real. Do you check your iPhone before you get out of bed? During family dinners? Right before you go to sleep? Constantly during the day even when you’re on vacation? If you—or your family members—feel that you’re disappearing into your phone too often or at inappropriate times, it may be time to do something about it.

To start, you might want to quantify the problem, and for that, you can turn to a free iPhone app called Moment. Written by developer Kevin Holesh, Moment is designed to track three key pieces of data:

  • How often you pick up your iPhone every day
  • How much time you spend on your iPhone
  • Which apps you use the most

It then uses that information to paint a picture (well, not literally) of your iPhone use. Most people underestimate how much time they spend on their iPhones by about 100% (the average Moment user uses their iPhone for nearly 4 hours per day!). Knowing how much time you spend is the first step toward using your phone intentionally, rather than as a conduit to a constant stream of social media updates (look at the stats shown below), email messages, and quick-hit entertainment.

 
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To get started, use the App Store app to install Moment, and then launch the app. It starts tracking your usage immediately, although once per week you’ll need to take screenshots of Settings > Battery so Moment can figure out how long you use each app. Then ignore Moment for a few days so it can gather some data.

On the main Screen Time screen, Moment shows how much time you’ve spent on your phone today, along with a scrolling bar graph of how much time you spent every day since you installed Moment. Don’t get too hung up on these raw numbers, though, since Moment tracks every second the screen is on. You probably aren’t concerned about time spent reading an ebook or working out with an app that talks you through a routine.

To view both a breakdown by app and a timestamp for each time you picked up your iPhone, tap any day’s entry, and to see how much you use a particular app on average, tap it in the day view. You can answer a Yes/No question about whether you’re happy with how much you use the app, which informs the Time Well Spent aggregate data about which apps people are and are not concerned about.

 
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All that is helpful, but for a more useful overview, tap Insights and then Week. You’ll see graphs of your usage patterns for screen time, waking life, pickups, most used app, and sleep (this depends on your first and last pickups of the day, so take its data with a grain of salt). Tap any graph to see more detail, but wait until you’ve used Moment for a while.

 
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Everything we’ve described so far is free, but Moment offers additional features for a one-time $3.99 in-app purchase. They let you exclude certain apps from the app-use detection, if you don’t want to be dinged for using apps that are necessary or otherwise positive. You can receive quick reminders about your usage, and set daily time limits. There is even a 14-day Phone Bootcamp course that helps you rethink your relationship with your phone.

More interesting for parents is Moment Family, a subscription service ($26.99 for 6 months or $44.99 for 12 months) that allows you to monitor your entire family’s screen time with Moment, set phone-free dinner times, and enforce daily limits.

So if you’re perturbed by the amount of time you spend using your iPhone every day, give Moment a try. On its own, it won’t solve your problem but by showing you exactly how often you turn to your phone—and for what apps—it can help you regain control over your usage patterns. And if others in your family have trouble putting their iPhones down at dinner or to do homework, Moment Family could be the answer.

Install Minor Operating System Updates to Maintain Herd Immunity

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It seems like Apple releases updates to iOS, macOS, watchOS, and tvOS nearly every week these days. It has been only a few months since iOS 11 and macOS 10.13 High Sierra launched, and we’ve already seen ten updates to iOS and seven updates to macOS. Some of these have been to fix bugs, which is great, but quite a few have been prompted by the need for Apple to address security vulnerabilities.

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Have you installed all these updates, or have you been procrastinating, tapping that Later link on the iPhone and rejecting your Mac’s notifications? We’re not criticizing—all too often those prompts come at inconvenient times, although iOS has gotten better about installing during the night, as long as you plug in your iPhone or iPad.

We know, security is dull. Or rather, security is dull as long as it’s present. Things get exciting—and not in a good way—when major vulnerabilities come to light. That’s what happened in November 2017, when it was reported that anyone could gain admin access to any Mac running High Sierra by typing root for the username and leaving the password field blank. That one was so bad that Apple pushed Security Update 2017-001 to every affected Mac and rolled the fix into macOS 10.13.2.

Part of the problem with security vulnerabilities is that they can be astonishingly complex. You may have heard about the Meltdown and Spectre hardware vulnerabilities discovered in January 2018. They affect nearly all modern computers, regardless of operating system, because they take advantage of a design flaw in the microprocessors. Unfortunately, the bad guys—organized crime, government intelligence agencies, and the like—have the resources to understand and exploit these flaws.

But here’s the thing. Security is an arms race, with attackers trying to take advantage of vulnerabilities and operating system companies like Apple, Microsoft, and Google proactively working to block them with updates. If enough people install those updates quickly enough, the attackers will move on to the next vulnerability.

The moral of the story? Always install those minor updates. It’s not so much because you will definitely be targeted if you fail to stay up to date, but because if the Apple community as a whole ceases to be vigilant about upgrading, the dark forces on the Internet will start to see macOS and iOS as low-hanging fruit. As long as most people update relatively quickly, it’s not worthwhile for attackers to put a lot of resources into messing with Macs, iPhones, and iPads.

That said, before you install those updates, make sure to update your backups. It’s unusual for anything significant to go wrong during this sort of system upgrade, but having a fresh backup ensures that if anything does go amiss, you can easily get back to where you were before.

Don't Get Burned by Bad Cables

It can be hard to ante up for a quality Lightning or USB-C cable when just a little searching reveals cables that cost only a couple of bucks each. “Surely,” you might think, “the cheap cables might not be as good, but so what if they wear out sooner?”

Points for frugality, but this is one place you don’t want to skimp too far. With some types of cables, the worst that could happen is that the cable would stop working. But with any cable that carries power, like Lightning cables for iOS devices, a short could cause sparks, smoke, and even a fire. This isn’t a crazy concern: there have been numerous reports over the years of fires started by charging smartphones, both iPhones and models from other manufacturers. Apple even has a page that helps you identify counterfeit or uncertified Lightning cables.

If you have a MacBook or MacBook Pro with USB-C ports, fire hasn’t been an issue, but bad cables have been. In 2015 and 2016, Benson Leung, an engineer at Google, made it his mission to identify out-of-spec USB-C cables after a bad USB-C cable fried his Chromebook Pixel laptop. To summarize his findings, stick with cables sold by name-brand manufacturers like Apple, Anker, and Belkin—others may be fine, but you’ll need to do research to be certain. We personally sell Moshi, a product we love as they fit in well with the sleek Apple products, and of course, Apple-branded cables.

With Lightning cables, the same advice applies—buy cables only from well-known manufacturers like the ones mentioned above. You’ll pay a little more, but the cables will not only likely last longer, they’ll be less likely to damage your iPhone or iPad, or burn down your house.

That being said, any cable, if sufficiently mistreated, can short out and cause problems. Follow this advice to protect your devices from cable-related issues:

  • When coiling your cables, avoid wrapping them tightly around something. A tight wrap can cause kinks that will degrade the wires inside.**
  • Don’t create sharp bends in the cable, especially near the connector. Sharp bends can eventually break the insulation and reveal the wires inside.
  • When unplugging your device, pull from the plug instead of the cord. That avoids stress near the connector.
 
 
  • Keep the Lightning connector’s pins clean and away from liquids; crud or a drop of water on the pins could cause a short circuit. USB-C cables are less susceptible to such problems because of their metal jackets, but still be careful.
  • If a cable’s insulation ever breaks such that you can see the wires inside, wrap it with electrical tape right away, and replace it as soon as you can.
 
 

Don’t freak out about cable safety—although there have been problems, hundreds of millions of people have never experienced any trouble at all. But it’s still worth buying quality cables and taking good care of them.

**To help prevent the wear and tear on your laptop chargers, we love the JuiceBoxx! We have these available in store to help extend the life of your chargers.

Tips & Tricks: The Data Edition

Data. It's one thing you don't want to mess around with. It's as unpredictable as the weather. One minute, your hard drive indicates it's on its way to failing, but your information will still show it up... and then... BOOM, a second later, it's gone. It went from a couple hundred dollar fix to over a thousand. Just don't put yourself in that situation. We will tell you minimize your risk of this happening. 

Losing your data and needing to send it to a clean room is fairly preventable. Sometimes, your luck just completely runs out and that's the only option. (Picture this: the backup of your backup of your backup fails, and then the backup of your backup fails, and then your backup fails, and then your hard drive dies. That's pretty bad luck).

But, if you do a regular backup of your machine, and possibly even another backup of your most precious data, if your hard drive ever fails, you can just restore from your backup. How can you start backing up, you ask? Apple makes it easy with Time Machine. Here's how to set it up:

  1. Connect the external hard drive you're planning on using.
  2. Go to the Apple menu at the top left and click on System Preferences
  3. Click the Time Machine icon
  4. Click the Select Backup Disk button
  5. Choose the external hard drive from the menu to set it up. If you click Show Time Machine in menu bar, simply
  6. Go to the icon in the menu bar, and select Back Up Now
  7. Let it run its course, and voilà. You have your data backed up. (Don't forget to eject your hard drive before you unplug it)

We'll keep talking to you until we're blue in the face on the importance of backing up. We don't want to see your precious memories lost, but data is its own animal. And sometimes it's a wild animal backed up into a corner. Don't let yourself be in this situation. We always breathe a sigh of relief when we hear customers are backing up.

Do yourself a favor, come to MacExperience, and we can either sell you an external hard drive and help you set up Time Machine, or schedule a training session and we will share with you the ins and outs of how to be the safest with your data. Help us help you! 

What's the Deal with Two-Step Verification?

It seems that we can’t go a week without hearing about some new security breach involving tens of thousands or even millions of passwords. That’s why it’s essential that you use strong passwords of random characters (and manage them in a full-featured password manager like 1Password or LastPass or, for a more basic approach, iCloud Keychain). But many major Internet companies like Apple, Google, Facebook, and Dropbox offer an option for a higher level of security, called two-step verification.

With a normal account, a bad guy has to get only one thing—your password—to break in. With an account that’s protected by two-step verification, however, breaking in becomes far more difficult. That’s because logging in requires both your normal password and a time-limited one-time password that is generated by a special authentication app or sent to you in an SMS text message or via email. What’s important about these secondary passwords is that they’re valid only for a short time and they can be used only once. You have to enter these secondary passwords only the first time that you log in on a particular device or in a particular Web browser, so they are just an occasional extra step, not a daily inconvenience.

Sites that offer two-step verification will provide setup and usage instructions, but the basics are as follows. You’ll enable two-step verification in the account settings, and then tell the site how you’ll get the one-time password when you want to log in, generally providing your phone number or email address. For services that use an authentication app like Google Authenticator, Authy, or 1Password, you’ll have to scan a QR code on screen or enter a secret key—either way, that seeds the app with a value that enables it to generate a valid one-time password every 30 seconds. Make sure to record any backup codes the site provides; they’re essential if you lose access to your phone or your email.

When it comes time to log in to a service protected by two-step verification, you’ll enter your username and password as you normally would. Then, you’ll be prompted for a one-time password, and the service will either send you one via SMS or email, or require you to look it up in your authenticator app. Since a bad guy who might have obtained your normal password would also have to intercept your text or email messages, or have stolen your mobile phone (and be able to get past its passcode), you’re far, far safer.

Most sites that use two-step verification don’t require that you enter a one-time password on every login, since that would be overkill. It’s also unnecessary to enable two-step verification for every account you might have—there isn’t much liability to someone logging in to your New York Times account since they couldn’t do anything diabolical once in. For more-important accounts—email, social media, cloud services, banking—you absolutely should use two-step verification for added protection so a bad guy can’t impersonate you to your friends, receive email-based password resets for other sites, or access your most important data.

You may also hear the term two-factor authentication, which is even more secure than two-step verification when implemented correctly. That’s because two-factor authentication combines something you know (your password) with something you have (such as a secure token keyfob that generates time-limited one-time passwords) or something that’s true of you (biometric info like a fingerprint or iris scan). It might seem like using your iPhone to get a text message or run an authenticator app qualifies, but if you end up doing everything on a single device that could be compromised, it’s not true two-factor authentication.

Regardless of the terminology, going beyond a single password, no matter how strong, significantly increases your security, and you would be well served to employ such a security technology for your most important accounts. To learn more about why strong passwords are necessary, using password managers, and even more details behind two-step verification and two-factor authentication, check out Take Control of Your Passwords.

What are you thankful for?

  • A place to lay your head at night?
  • A roof?
  • A car that runs?
  • A job?
  • A wife or husband?
  • A son or daughter?
  • Food?
  • Fast food?
  • Bacon?
  • Parents that taught you right from wrong?
  • Disposable diapers?
  • Deodorant?
  • Education?
  • A boss that doesn't bother you?
  • A boss that drives you to become better?
  • A friend that sticks closer than a brother?
  • A brother that will give you the shirt off his back?
  • Ears to hear music?
  • Eyes to see art?
  • The sense of touch to feel a warm embrace?
  • The smell of coffee on a cold morning?
  • Freedom to serve others?
  • Freedom to love others?
  • The internet at your fingertips?
  • That you won't have to mow the lawn until spring?
  • Technology to reconnect with someone?
  • Faith, hope, and love?
  • Grandchildren?

This list could go on– probably forever. Don't let this season go by without letting someone know what you're thankful for, that you're thankful for them. The world will go on. It's time to focus on the good, the positive. At the end of the day, we all want to be surrounded by our loved ones. Be thankful for what you have, and know that the best is yet to come.

 

The Age-Old Question: When Should You Do a Software Update?

It’s that time of year again, as the leaves start to turn, the air gets crisp, the grass is covered with frost in the morning, and Apple releases major operating system upgrades. We’ve known this was coming since the company’s announcement in June, but now it’s time to think hard about when you’ll upgrade.

(Note that we say “when” and not “if.” There’s no harm in delaying an upgrade until Apple has had a chance to squash the 1.0 bugs and it’s a convenient time in your schedule. But waiting for too long can put you at risk from security vulnerabilities and prevent you from taking advantage of new integrations between Apple’s devices. Plus, should you have to replace a Mac or iOS device unexpectedly, you may be forced to use the current operating system, which could be awkward if you weren’t ready for the upgrade.)

Let’s dispense with the easiest answer right off. If you have a fourth-generation Apple TV, either let it upgrade itself to tvOS 10 or manually invoke the upgrade from Settings > System > Software Updates. Since tvOS 10 is a relatively minor update and you don’t create work on an Apple TV, upgrading is unlikely to cause any problems. If you’re a major TV junkie and are paranoid about how the upgrade could prevent you from watching your favorite show, just wait a few weeks until other users have reported on their experiences on the Internet.

In some ways, the question of when to upgrade to watchOS 3 has a similar answer. Although watchOS 3 is a major upgrade that radically changes how you interact with the Apple Watch, the improvements are so significant and the downsides so minimal that it’s easy to recommend an immediate upgrade. However, to install watchOS 3, you must have upgraded your iPhone to iOS 10 first. So…

What about iOS 10? Now we need to hedge a little. Although iOS 10 has been getting good reviews from beta testers, if you rely on an app that isn’t compatible, you’ll want to put off your upgrade. Check the App Store listing for your key apps, and if they’ve been updated recently, you’re probably OK. The other thing to remember is that iOS 10 changes the Lock screen behavior, so it may be worth delaying the upgrade until you have some time to poke at the new interface. Messages and Photos also receive a bunch of new features that you may want to play with, but you shouldn’t have any trouble using them before you’ve figured out the new stuff.

As always, the rubber meets the road on the Mac. Like iOS 10, macOS 10.12 Sierra has gotten good reviews from beta testers, but if you rely on your Mac to get your work done, it’s important to ensure that your key apps are compatible. Plus, despite Apple’s public beta, it’s not uncommon for unanticipated problems to surface once the first release of a new operating system for the Mac becomes more broadly available. Unless you’re dying to use the new features in Sierra that integrate with iOS 10 and watchOS 3, we recommend waiting until version 10.12.1 or even 10.12.2 before upgrading. That gives you plenty of time to make sure your apps and workflows will work in Sierra.

Finally, we just want to say that as much as change can be hard, we’re excited about Apple’s new operating systems. Like you, we probably won’t end up using all the new features, but some of them will definitely enhance the experience of being an Apple user.

External HDD Sale until 12/24

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External-HD

Why do you need an external HD?  

To save all of your photos, music, movies, and important documents. Backing up to iCloud will not protect your entire computer, but an external hard drive with TimeMachine (software that is part of your computer) will back everything up.  If you spill liquid on your computer, you might lose everything. If your computer gets stolen you will lose everything. And sometimes, hard drives just fail and you lose everything.  Having a backup to an external hard drive will give you comfort in knowing that everything is always there.

Take advantage of our sale this season and save 10% on all external hard drives.

JuiceBoxx on sale until 12/24/15

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JuiceBoxx

The Juiceboxx charger case keeps your cable from going bad at the base.  Perhaps you or someone you know has a bad charging cable at the base of it. Guess what? If your computer is out of warranty, your charging cable probably is too.  Protect it against over tightening it with a Juiceboxx charger case.  On sale now through December 24. 2015. 

Search within a webpage on your iPhone

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Searching for information is great! We have it right at our fingertips with a web search engine on our smartphones.  But have you ever wanted to look for something specific inside of a webpage itself on your iPhone?  Safari, the web browser on your iPhone can do just that. Let's say you want to find Sarah Connor mentions from within a Terminator: Genisys review. Just visit the page in Safari, tap the address/search box at the top of the screen, tap the little “x” button to clear out the URL, then type “Sarah.”

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At the bottom of the search results, you’ll see an “On This Page” heading. Tap “Find ‘Sarah’” to highlight every mention of the word on the page. From there you can tap the arrows at the bottom of the screen to cycle through each mention.

Safari Reader Fonts

What do you spend the most amount of time doing on your Mac or iPhone? The real answer might be play games, text, Instagram, Facebook, or Pinterest, but let's pretend that it's surf the web.  You might even find yourself reading blogs like this one, or catching up on the news. And because you spend so much time on the internet reading, you might like the Safari Reader Fonts option. If you're not familiar with Reader in Safari, it's allows you to view news stories and other articles in a layout that’s optimized for easy reading. Reader lets you focus on the text without being distracted by ads. Reader is available where there is a 4 line icon on the left side of the search bar.

And now you can customize your view by selecting your font size and style, and choose Sepia and Night themes.  Simply select "Reader" and then select the "AA" on the right side of the search bar.

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What is Wi-Fi Assist and do I want it?

You’ve downloaded iOS9 and seem some fancy new tricks right? But did you know that Wi-Fi Assist is one of those new features? For most users it’s a great addition to Apple’s mobile operating system, to others, maybe not. What is Wi-fi Assist and why is so great? Did you know most users experience a few moments of connectivity loss as they walk or drive away from their Wi-Fi network? This happens as the last wisps of Wi-Fi connectivity fail but before the iPhone can recognize and switch to the cellular data connection. With Wi-Fi Assist, the iPhone will detect that the Wi-Fi network signal is degrading and actively switch over to the cellular connection before a complete loss of the Wi-Fi signal. This should create an experience that is seamless to the user and allows them to continue their Internet use without interruption as they leave the house or office.  Pretty cool right?

However, there may be times in which Wi-Fi Assist may “booger up”  the user experience. In terms of data usage, Wi-Fi Assist doesn’t just help maintain interruption-free connectivity when the user leaves home; it also activates the cellular data connection whenever a user’s Wi-Fi signal gets weak. If you have a large data cap you may not mind this, but for those on a more limited data plan, might not want their cellular data connection kicking in without some kind of warning. If a Wi-Fi signal is still available, even a poor one, you might want to continue using it to save your limited data.

Then there are some mobile apps that require a connection to a specific Wi-Fi network for security and functionality purposes, particularly in enterprise settings. In this case, Wi-Fi Assist may switch the user to a cellular connection sooner than they want or anticipate, resulting in a total loss of connection for a particular network-dependent app, instead of just having slow speeds on the existing Wi-Fi network.

Wi-Fi Assist, by default, is enabled when a user upgrades to iOS 9, without providing any prompts or warnings that it has done so. Thankfully though, it’s easy to disable Wi-Fi Assist if you decide it’s not right for you.

To disable Wi-Fi Assist in iOS 9, head to Settings > Cellular. Scroll down to the bottom of the page and you’ll see an entry for Wi-Fi Assist. Tap the toggle switch to set it to Off (white).

Watch this short video to see how to disable Wi-Fi Assist in iOS9.

I Love my Leader

Love is a pretty strong word to use about your leader.  We use the word pretty flippantly any more though. We’re quick to use “love” when are talking about a movie, a book, pizza, a car, a cup of coffee, a beer, or our new smartphone.  But we are slower to say “love” about a person.  I guess that is because we don’t know if the other person loves us back.  We know the frosty mug of beer or a movie is not going to love us back, so who cares if we say we love them? So do I love my Leader.  Some of my leaders I genuinely do love.  I love parents, I love my Pastor and the Elders of my church. Those are some of the easier leaders to confess my love for.  But what about my government leaders, police, teachers, or boss.  I’m happy that I live in the USA and I would defend America to the end.  I’m thankful for police that they are here to serve and protect me.  But for the most part, my government leaders and policemen are at a distance.  It’s hard to love them because I don’t feel loved back.  I know that they are concerned for me, but that is about as far as it goes.

Teachers are in closer contact to me.  They see me regularly, so I interact with them, sometimes on a personal level.  But we rarely discuss personal things.  I don’t know what is going on with their lives nor them about me.

Then there is my boss. This guy knows my kids' names and I know his.  He is genuinely invested in my life.  Yes, he asks me to work, and work hard for the company, for him.  But it’s easy for me to do, not because of the paycheck (although I’m thankful for that as well), but because I want him to succeed.  I’ve been fortunate to have a lot of great bosses in the past.  Don't get me wrong, I’ve had a few jerks as well.  But the attention and concern my boss gives to me and to all that are around him, makes me want to give back.  I see how he wants our customers to succeed without being selfish about his own company growth, and that speaks loud to me as a man, not just an employee.

Do I love my leaders?  Not all of them, but the owner of MacExperience, Joel Read… Let’s just say he knows how I feel.

Time Keeps on Slippin...

…. in to the future…. (digital arpeggios)  We love to spend time with friends and family.  We love to spend time relaxing at the beach. We love to spend our time with a good book. Time is a commodity and we spend it like we do money. You’ve even heard it said “time is money”. We pinch pennies when we need to with research to make sure that we don’t waste our hard earned paycheck.  We search for the cheapest gas prices, we even drive to multiple grocery stores to save a few bucks.  We spend a lot of time and effort to save money.

Would you be willing to trade $50 a month for 4 hours of time with a loved one? I would.  The time it takes to drive from one store to the next, plus the time in the store waiting in line at the checkout, adds a lot of time and effort.  (side note: are you really saving money after you add gas and vehicle maintenance driving from store to store)

Here is a thought. Stop spending time and effort on crazy things that really don’t save you that much money.  Go to one store.  Make it a local store to support your community. Take that precious time you save and spend it where you want.  Like that yard project, or book you’ve been meaning to read, spend time with your kids over a board game, or catching up on sleep (your complaining of being tired is getting old).

For the businesses out there: Learn to love your job again by spending your time and effort on what you do best.  Hire someone else to design the website, to do the bookkeeping, to clean the toilets.  It’s not an easy thing to just jump into when the pockets are empty.  But I’m sure that if you spend your time and efforts on what you love, you will reap the benefits and be able to outsource the things you hate.

Security Alert: Backdoor iWorm

Hello Mac Users, MacExperience wants to keep everyone informed and updated on the latest Mac OS Security issues.

Most Mac computer users know malware is less common on Macs than on Windows. Even though Apple provides built in security such as GateKeeper and File Quarantine, Mac users should not take their OS X security for granted

Macs aren’t immune to malware. Recently, there have been many issues of Malware infecting Mac computers like Genieo. Additionally, a new Mac Malware called Mac.Backdoor.iWorm is making rounds infecting Mac computers to be used as Botnets.

Therefore, MacExperience recommends some steps you can take to improve your security on Mac computers. Here are some easy ways you can improve your Mac security.

1. Keep your OS X software updated with the latest patches and OS software updates.

2. Set GateKeeper to only run digitally signed apps from the Mac App Store. This setting is in System preferences under Security and Privacy. 

3. Run anti-virus/anti-malware software on your Macs.

Mac computers have become very popular. As a result, more malicious code is being written to take advantage of unprotected computers.

4. Limit the use of Administrator accounts

Allow only necessary admin accounts to install and modify system settings. Don’t share administrator names and passwords. Log out when you leave your Mac so unauthorized people don’t use your Mac with administrator privileges. Require a password to wake your Mac from sleep or screen saver.

Contact MacExperience

For more information on Mac Security solutions for home or your business. MacExperience offers solutions to protect your personal or business assets.

 

Other recent OS X security news:

Also in the news was the known security issue regarding the Bash exploit. The OS X bash update can be found directly at Apple.com.

http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1769

More on GateKeeper: http://support.apple.com/kb/ht5290

*** UPDATE: Oct. 7th *** Apple has added the new iWorm definitions to detect this malware.

The Short List

The short list of the Apple Event yesterday. Those of us that were watching struggled with the video feed., but we pushed through and learned of all the new “killer” products.

Apple announced that they want to control of your wallet with Apple Pay, a contactless payment technology coming this October.

They announced 2 new phones, the iPhone 6 with a 4.7” screen, and iPhone 6 Plus with a 5.5” screen. We have a full comparison of the iPhone line.

iOS 8 will be available on Wednesday, September 17, 2014.

But wait there’s more.  The new wearable, Apple Watch.  With three models available and prices starting at $349.

The 2 hour event was ended with U2 playing the first track from their new full length album,  “Songs Of Innocence”,  released with a free download at iTunes.

 

Share a list in Reminders

Share Reminders 1 Not only is it easy to create and edit reminders, but you can also share and collaborate on lists with anyone else in the world, even if they don’t have an Apple Device with them. All they need is an iCloud account.

To be clear, you cant invite others to share your Reminders lists from your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch. You have use your Reminders app on the OSX version 10.8.2 or later. If you don’t use a Mac computer, you can access Reminders from iCloud.com. Just log in using your iCloud account information. Most people’s iCloud account is the same as their Apple ID (the account info and password used to buy music and apps).

The steps:

1. Launch Reminders app on OSX or iCloud.com

2. Create a list you want to share with others.

3. Hover over the right side of the list you want to share and select the broadcast icon that appears

4. Enter the iCloud connected email address for anyone you want to invite to the list.

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Once you’ve shared a list, the person or people you are sharing with can see all of your archived items, plus the current list. They can also edit the list. So, if you share a grocery list with your spouse, the two of you can add or remove any items. It is as if you are sitting in the kitchen together while making the list.

When a person accepts your invitation to share a Reminder list, you will receive an alert on all devices that feature the Reminders app.

All changes that are made to your list will be immediately viewable in our iOS Reminders app. So, if your spouse makes a note on one of your items, you’ll know about it before putting it in the cart.

You can remove someone just as easily as you invited them. Hover over the broadcast icon again and click on their name. Select “Remove” and you're done. They will no longer have access to your list. However, all of their changes will remain on your list.

 

Bump Your Apple TV

Did you know that you can setup an Apple TV by simply bumping your iPhone to your Apple TV? It's true. If your iPhone is already connected to your home wifi network and logged in to your Apple ID, you can simply bump your iPhone to your Apple TV during the setup process on the language select screen and the Apple TV will automatically import your wifi and Apple ID settings from your iPhone.

What is required?

A WiFi network Apple TV 3rd Gen using Apple TV software 6.0 or later One of the following iOS devices running iOS 7 or later:

  •    iPhone 4s or later
  •    iPad 3rd gen or later
  •    iPad mini
  •    iPod touch 5th gen

The steps:

  1. Connect your Apple TV to your television and power and wait until you Apple TV displays the setup screen.
  2. Unlock your iOS 7 device and ensure that Bluetooth is enabled. Also ensure that you are connected to the Wi-Fi network you want to use with Apple TV.
  3. Touch your iOS device to your Apple TV and wait for the prompts to appear on your iOS device and Apple TV.
  4. Enter your Apple ID and password on your iOS device.
  5. Choose if you want Apple TV to remember your Apple ID password, and if you want Apple TV to send data to Apple.
Note: This does not change your iOS device preferences.
  6. Your Apple TV will start the configuration process, including connecting to your Wi-Fi network, activating Apple TV, and setting up your iTunes Store account.
  7. When complete, your Apple TV is ready to use.

Note: While configuring your Apple TV, keep your iOS device within 10 to 15 feet of your Apple TV until the configuration process completes.

How to pin an app to a specific Mission Control Desktop

How to pin an app to a specific Mission Control Desktop Mission Control 101

 

You can assign an app to a specific desktop in Mission Control—perfect for keeping your programs in their proper “spaces,” particularly when you’re booting up your Mac.

 

Before we begin, something to keep in mind: this trick applies only to apps running in standard  “windowed” mode. Programs running in “full screen” automatically get assigned to their own desktops.

 

Related: Desktop "Spaces in Mission Control

 

Are you ready to start “pinning” your apps to specific desktops? Here we go…

Just select “This Desktop” to pin an app to a specific Mission Control desktop.

▪ First, navigate to the desktop where you’d like a particular program to call home. If, for example, you want Calendar to sit in Desktop 2, launch Mission Control, then click on Desktop 2 from the overhead Mission Control view (or create a second desktop if there isn’t one already).

▪ Launch the app you want to assign to the desktop—again, let’s use Calendar as our example.

▪ Go down to the Mac desktop dock at the bottom of the screen, find the icon for Calendar, and right-click it.

▪ In the menu that appears, select Options, then select “This Desktop” under the “Assign to” heading.

 

Now, let’s test. Go ahead and close the app you just assigned to a desktop, navigate to Desktop 1 in Mission Control, then launch the app again—and when you do, it should launch in the desktop you assigned it to.

 

Also, if the app you’ve pinned to a desktop opens automatically when you start up your Mac, the app will now launch in its assigned window.

 

 

OK, but what if you want to “unpin” an app from a desktop? Just right-click its icon in the dock, select Options, then select “None” under “Assign to.”

Desktop "Spaces" in Mission Control

Mission Control 103 Did you know that there’s more than one desktop on your Mac? Yep, it’s true, you can pretty much have as many desktops as you want, each filled with its own assortment of open documents and applications.

Most of us are used to having a single desktop on our systems—you know, the one that’s directly in front of us. The idea of have more, “virtual” desktop spaces with open windows that you can’t see can take a little getting used to. Once you get the hang of it, these additional desktop spaces—which you manage in Mac OS X with a new feature, dubbed “Mission Control”—can become addicting, even essential. Let’s take a quick tour of the desktop spaces in “Mission Control”—and keep in mind that older versions of the Mac operating system also have the “spaces” feature, which you can manage in the System Preferences panel under the Apple menu.

mission control 104

1. First, activate Mission Control by clicking its icon in the Mac OS “Dock,” or swiping up with three fingertips on your MacBook trackpad. You can also turn Mission Control on by hitting the F3 key on your keyboard.

 

2. Now, you’ll see an overhead view of all your open applications, windows, and spaces. On your desktop, you may have five applications open—Mail, iPhoto, iCal, iTunes, and Safari, not to mention a total of three Safari open windows at once. Things may start to get a little crowded.

mission control 106

3. Time to spread out a little bit. Activate Mission Control again, click and hold the app window you want to move to a different “desktop”, and then drag it up and over to the upper-right corner of the screen—where all of a sudden, a new “space” with a big “+” sign appears.

4. Drop the app into your new space, and presto! Now you have another desktop with just the one application open. To visit your new space, just activate Mission Control and click the Desktop icon, which immediately zooms in and fills your screen.

mission control 107

5. Now go ahead repeat with more open applications. To switch between your desktops, open Mission Control and click the desktop space you want to jump to. You can also scroll though them one-by-one with a sideways three-finger swipe on your trackpad, or by tapping a left or right arrow key on the keyboard while holding down the Control key.

Mission Control 101

6. Want to clean up your spaces? Activate Mission Control, then hold your mouse over the space you want to close until a circle with an “x” appears on its corner. Click the “x,” and the space will disappear, with any open windows safely sliding over to one of your remaining spaces (so don’t worry, you won’t lose any work).

Give it a try!